New Report Shows More People Think Renting Is More Affordable Than Buying A Home

Thanks to a recent study we know that more than 70% of Americans now consider renting a home to be more affordable than buying a home.

The recent data from Freddie Mac found that close to 80% of Americans would prefer to rent instead of buy, this is up sharply from close to 67% of Americans who felt that renting was more affordable than buying a home just a short six months ago.

What’s even more shocking is that close to 58% of Renters have said that they have no plans to buy a home within the near future. This is up from 54 percent of renters who are surveyed over the same period.

What’s Happening with The Real Estate Market?

Among the usual suspects: Mortgage rates are up to nearly 5 percent, the highest they’ve been in seven years. The new rate is one percentage point higher than the beginning of the year. Rates are being pushed up by recent hikes in the Federal Reserve’s benchmark interest rate.

But it doesn’t mean renting is necessarily affordable.

Freddie Mac’s survey found that two-thirds of renters say they have had trouble paying their monthly bill in the last two years. Almost 9 out of 10 renters with occupations in what Freddie Mac considers “essential” fields — including healthcare and education — say they have had trouble cutting their landlords checks.

 

More Opportunity for You

On an encouraging note, the obvious benefit that can be gleaned from this article is the fact that with more people viewing renting as being more affordable and favorable than buying, this means more opportunities for people who own rental property.

The key to success though with owning rental property in Houston or else was across the United States is not having to do all the work yourself. Once you own a property you should hire a property management company to manage that rental property for you.

This will save you the time and hassle of having to do things like rent collection, maintenance and communicating with tenants so that you could focus on growing your portfolio of rental properties while living your normal life.

To learn more about the Property Management contact us today (832) 971-1841 or click here to connect with us online.

Should You Change the Locks After Your Tenant Moves Out?

One of the biggest questions that landlords have had over the years is if they should change the locks after their tenant moves out of their rental property.

The answer to this question is yes, you should always change the locks to your rental property after your tenant moves out especially since they could have made a key while they lived there and that key could gain them entry back into the property after they’ve moved out.

Other Times You Should Change the Locks to Your Rental Property

Besides changing the locks after your tenant moves out of your rental property, you should also change the locks for the following reasons:

When a Key Is Lost

It might seem overkill to change the locks after a renter loses just one key, but it′s a small price to pay to guarantee peace of mind for the manager, the owner, and the tenant. While it′s unlikely the lost key will end up in the wrong hands, in the off chance that it does, it could spell disaster for all. When you′re dealing with prospective renters, letting them know that you take this extra security measure seriously can be a differentiator that demonstrates your commitment to safety.

When a Vendor Is Finished Working on the Property

Especially if you′ve just started using a new vendor or if you′ve had disagreements with one in the past, it′s important to recognize that vendors could have copies of your keys that you′re unaware of. When work is completed, hiring an independent locksmith to change your locks helps maintain a high degree of security. It′s also a good idea to be on-site to let vendors in and out of a building while you build a relationship with them instead of leaving a key in a lockbox and allowing all contractors to access it.

According to statistics from the FBI, 73.2 percent of all burglaries are committed on residential properties. When a tenant moves into a property, unless the locks are brand-new, it′s impossible for them to know who has made copies over the years and can access the unit at any time. Just one safety mistake has the potential to result in break-ins, theft, and, in the worst-case scenario, the irreparable loss of human life.

A great way for property managers to stay on top of security measures is by using smart home technologies, including smart locks and exterior cameras. Smart locks with access codes can log who enters a property and the time of entry, preventing landlords from having to have locks rekeyed for new tenants or vendors. Exterior cameras can record clips at unoccupied properties (as well as be an asset to tenants for self-monitored security when they move in).

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Need property management for Houston Texas or the surrounding area? Contact VestPro Residential Services by calling us at (832) 971-1841 or click here to connect with us online.

Enjoy The Tax Benefits Of Renting Your Home During Special Events

 

Are you planning on going on vacation this year? If so, you might want to wait to go on vacation during an annual event in the Houston area.

You may be able to rent your home for more money while a special event is in progress like Comicpalooza because more people will be in town during the week of that event and willing to pay higher rental rates.

Could Be Tax Free Income

Homeowners go on vacation and make tax-free income while temporary tenants rent their home. Homeowners can benefit from a little known provision in the tax code that does not require taxpayers to recognize the income derived from renting their home for less than 15 days per year. See Plan Ahead for Tax Time When Renting Out Residential or Vacation Property- special rules.

This situation can particularly benefit homeowners where there are large sporting events nearby like golf and tennis tournaments, championship games or other high attendance venues. The demand for a private residence can be more attractive than staying in a hotel which makes the price go up.

Obviously, there are challenges with personal belongings and damage but getting a premium rental rate and not having to recognize the income could be worth it. You’ll certainly want to discuss this with your tax professional prior to making this decision. You’d probably also want to get some help from an experienced real estate professional.

Source – In Touch Weekly

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For professional property management in the Houston Texas area contact us today by calling (832) 971-1841 or click here to connect with us online.

 

 

How to make landscape maintenance easier at your Houston rental property

Is landscape maintenance a problem at your Houston rental property? If so, like most owners you’re probably searching for ways to simplify landscape maintenance to either make your job easier or ensure that the landscaping is easy for your tenants to maintain.

Thankfully, landscape maintenance is easier than ever before especially if you follow these simple tips.

Invest in a Tractor

Getting the job done easily and efficiently comes down to having the best equipment. If you don’t currently have a tractor to help with your landscaping, this should be the number one item on your list.

“Whether you are building a fish pond, retaining wall or planting shrubs to beautify your home, you need a tractor,” says Dave Boyt at Hobbyfarms.com. “Use the front end loader of rear lift to move rocks and fill dirt and the blade to sculpt the ground, level off hills, direct drainage and build small ponds.”

When choosing a tractor, the most important factor to consider is horsepower: “If you are going to make a mistake, always make the mistake of buying too much horsepower,” says William C. Nelson III, president of Nelson Tractor Company. Horsepower will determine load size, which attachments you can use, and more.

Use this guide from Countryside Daily to determine the best tractor for your needs.

Choose Native Plants

Before you start planning the layout of your flowerbed or garden, find out which plants are native to your area. Native plants have already been proven to thrive in the soil and the climate in your immediate area, allowing you to do less while maintaining their regular growing cycle, according to Better Homes and Gardens.

Use the official USDA zone map to determine which plants will live most successfully in your region.

Build a Berm

A berm, or a small mound of dirt where you can plant flowers and trees, is a great way to make landscaping easier for two reasons:

  1. This landscaping element helps with drainage, thanks to the gentle slope of the mound. That means you have to worry less about overwatering your plants, as extra water will flow down the sides.
  2. A berm creates a focal point in your yard. With just one out front or back, you can forget about dealing with extra plants and other elements that would require more work to maintain. Add brightly colored plants to make it stand out.

HouseLogic recommends keeping the berm about 2 feet high, with 4 to 6 feet in width for every foot in height.

Don’t Focus on Plants & Trees

Plants and trees are what take a lot of maintenance time. Instead, focus on turning your landscape into an oasis with other elements that will look great even without regular upkeep. For example, build a flat rock walkway from your garage to the back patio, or create a community space where residents can sit on benches and enjoy evening fires. These small touches will go a long way in creating an inviting space that doesn’t require constant maintenance.

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For professional property management contact Vestpro Residential Services at (832) 498-0016 or click here to connect with us online.

What tax impact will disasters have for Houston rental property owners?

Once it’s finished, 2017 will be remembered as one of the toughest years in recent memory especially thanks to Hurricane Harvey which formed on August 17th, carving a path of destruction in Houston and along the Gulf Coast until it dissipated on September 3rd.

What Tax Impact Will Natural Disasters Have For Property Owners In Houston?

When a major disaster occurs, the IRS normally tries to help the victims out by extending tax deadlines. After all, no one wants to have to worry about making tax payments or filing returns while their property is underwater or destroyed by a fire. For example, victims of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria will not be required to make most types of tax payments and filings until January 31, 2018.

The IRS automatically identifies taxpayers located in a covered disaster area and applies the extended deadlines. Thus, to benefit from the extended deadlines, your rental property simply has to be located in a federally declared major disaster area. There is no need to ask the IRS for a deadline extension. You can determine if an area has been declared a disaster area by checking the FEMA website.

Deducting Losses from a Disaster

Insurance is always the first line of financial defense when disasters occur. However, not all rental properties are fully covered for losses due to natural disasters. Some types of losses may not be covered at all. For example, losses due to floods, hurricanes, and earthquakes may not be covered unless the property owner has obtained a supplemental policy. Even if a loss is covered, the property owner may still have to pay for part of the cost of repairing or replacing the rental property.

Fortunately, any uninsured casualty losses are deductible by rental property owners, subject to certain limitations. A “casualty” is damage, destruction, or loss of property due to an event that is sudden, unexpected, or unusual. Deductible casualty losses can result from many different causes, including (but not limited to):

  • Earthquakes
  • Fires
  • Floods
  • Government-ordered demolition or relocation of a building that is unsafe to use because of a disaster
  • Landslides
  • Sonic booms
  • Storms, including hurricanes and tornadoes
  • Terrorist attacks
  • Vandalism, including vandalism to rental properties by tenants
  • Volcanic eruptions

One thing that all of the events in the above list have in common is that they are sudden—they happen quickly. Suddenness is the hallmark of a casualty loss. Thus, loss of property due to slow, progressive deterioration is not deductible as a casualty loss. For example, the steady weakening or deterioration of a rental building due to normal wind and weather conditions is not a deductible casualty loss.

The Role of Insurance After a Disaster

A rental property owner may take a deduction for casualty losses only to the extent that the loss is not covered by insurance. If the loss is fully covered, there is no deduction. A property owner can’t avoid this rule by not filing an insurance claim. Indeed, a timely insurance claim must be filed, even if it will result in cancellation of the property owner’s policy or an increase in premiums.

The amount of the claimed casualty loss must be reduced by any insurance recovery received, or reasonably expected to be received if it hasn’t yet been paid. If it later turns out that the property owner receives less insurance than expected, the owner can deduct the amount the following year. If the owner receives more insurance payments than expected, the extra amount is included as income for the year in which it is received.

Amount of Casualty Loss Deduction

How much a rental property owner may deduct depends on whether the property was completely or partially destroyed.

If the property is completely destroyed (or stolen), the deduction is calculated as follows:

Adjusted basis – salvage value– insurance proceeds = Deductible loss

Adjusted basis is the property’s original cost, plus the value of any improvements, minus any deductions taken for depreciation or Section 179 expensing. The adjusted basis for rental buildings, land improvements, and landscaping are each determined separately. Adjusted basis should be easily found from a rental property’s depreciation schedules and/or tax returns filed for the property. Salvage value is the value of whatever remains after the property 
is destroyed; in cases of total destruction, this is often nothing.

If the rental property is not completely destroyed, the amount of the casualty loss is the lesser of 1. The property’s adjusted basis or 2. The decrease in the fair market value of the property due to the casualty, minus any salvage value and insurance proceeds.

An appraisal can be used to determine the reduction in fair market value of partly damaged property, as well as salvage value. Alternatively, the cost of cleaning up or making repairs after a casualty can be used as a measure of the decrease in fair market value if all of the following conditions are met:

  • The repairs are actually made
  • The repairs are necessary to bring the property back to the condition it was in before the casualty
  • The amount spent for repairs is not excessive
  • 
The repairs are for the damage only
  • 
The value of the property after the repairs is not greater than its value before the casualty

The amount of a casualty loss to rental property must be calculated separately for each item that is damaged or destroyed. This may include a rental building, landscaping, and other land improvements apart from the building. However, it is not necessary to separately deduct personal items inside a rental property, such as appliances.

Example of Casualty Losses

John’s rental building suffered wind damage due to a hurricane. The hurricane not only damaged the building, but damaged his landscaping—trees and shrubs—as well. John must separately calculate his casualty loss for the building and
 the landscaping. The adjusted basis of the building is $566,000. The trees and shrubs have an adjusted basis of $10,000. John hires an appraiser who determines that the fair market value of the building immediately before the hurricane was $700,000, and was $650,000 immediately afterwards. The fair market value of the trees and shrubs immediately before the casualty was $4000, and afterwards was $500. John’s insurance did not cover hurricane wind damage, so he expects to receive no insurance proceeds.

John calculates his casualty loss for the building as follows:

  • Adjusted basis of rental building before hurricane: $566,000
  • Fair market value before hurricane: $700,000
  • Fair market value after hurricane: 
$650,000
  • Decrease in fair market value: $50,000
  • Amount of loss (line 1 or line 4, whichever is less): $50,000
  • Insurance reimbursement: 
0
  • Deductible casualty loss = $50,000

John separately calculates his loss for the landscaping as follows:

  • Adjusted basis of landscaping before hurricane: $10,000
  • Fair market value before hurricane: $4,000
  • Fair market value after hurricane: 
$500
  • Decrease in fair market value: $3,500
  • Amount of loss (line 1 or line 4, whichever is less): $3,500
  • Insurance reimbursement: 0
  • Deductible casualty loss 
= $3,500

Deducting Losses in Federal Disaster Areas from Prior Year Taxes

Casualty losses are generally deductible in the year in which the casualty occurs. However, if a deductible casualty loss occurs in an area that is declared a federal disaster by the president, the property owner may elect to deduct the loss for the previous year. This will provide a quick tax refund, since the owner will get back part of the tax paid for the prior year. If the owner already filed the tax return for the prior year, an amended return for the year must be filed.

Casualty Gains

It’s quite common for a rental property owner to have a casualty gain rather than a loss. This occurs when the insurance reimbursement an owner receives exceeds the adjusted basis of a property that has been completely destroyed.

Example of Casualty Gains: Part 1

Sheila owns a rental building with a fair market value of $500,000. After years of depreciation deductions, its adjusted basis is $250,000. The building is totally destroyed in a fire. Sheila receives $480,000 in insurance proceeds. She has a $230,000 casualty gain.

A casualty gain is taxable income. However, the property owner need not pay tax on the gain the year it is received if the owner replaces the destroyed property and the cost exceeds the insurance recovery. Instead, the gain is postponed until the replacement property is ultimately sold or otherwise disposed of. The basis of the replacement property is reduced by the amount of this postponed gain.

To qualify as replacement property, the new property must be similar or related in service or use to the property it replaces. However, the rules are more liberal if the destroyed property was located in a federally declared disaster area. In this event, any replacement property acquired for use in any business is treated as replacement property. Moreover, the replacement property doesn’t have to be located in the federally declared disaster area.

To avoid paying tax on a casualty gain, the property must replaced within two years after the close of the first tax year in which insurance proceeds are received. However, if the property is located in a federally declared disaster are, this period is increased to four years.

The property owner doesn’t have to use the insurance proceeds to acquire the replacement property. Rather, the owner has the option of spending the money they receive from the insurance company for other purposes, and borrowing money to buy replacement property.

Example of Casualty Gains: Part 2

Assume that Sheila uses her $480,000 insurance proceeds to construct a new rental building. The new building cost $600,000. Sheila need not pay any tax on her $230,000 casualty gain since she reinvested her entire gain in replacement property. However, the basis of the new building is reduced by $230,000 to $370,000. This way, tax on the gain will have to be paid when Sheila ultimately disposes of the replacement property.

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For professional property management contact Vestpro Residential Services by calling us at (832) 971-1841 or click here to connect with us online.

Property Management Tips – Is It A Bad Thing To Own Too Many Rentals?

Are you thinking about buying rentals to add to your portfolio and are wondering if it can be a bad thing to own too many? The answer to this question is both yes and no.

Yes, it can be a bad thing to own too many rental properties unless you hire a professional property management company to manage those rentals for you.

If you’ve been “on the fence” debating if you should hire a property management company or not to professionally manage your rental properties, this article will provide you with reasons to hire a property manager.

Rent Collection

One of the biggest problems most property owners who own homes or multi-family properties have is collecting rent from their tenants each month especially when their tenants fall behind on paying.

Thankfully when you hire Vestpro Residential Services to manage your Houston Texas Rental Properties you can have confidence that your rentals will be professionally managed and rent will be collected from your tenants on time each month eliminating the need for you to contact tenants or start collections against them if they don’t pay.

Maintenance

Another big problem for some owners has been the issue of maintenance because, it’s not always easy to handle maintenance issues if you own multiple properties.

With Vestpro on your side you will have peace of mind in knowing that your tenants will call us when they have maintenance issues and this will also help you keep tenants as well because, your tenants will know that the can depend on the property management company to solve problems when they occur instead of hearing making empty promises.

Customer Service

Last of all, but most important is customer service.

Many property owners offer customer service and poor support so that whenever there is an issue at one or more of their properties it will go unresolved for weeks or months.

At Vestpro we take pride in offering great customer service so that if your tenants call in with an issue they will be served by true customer service professionals every time.

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To learn more about how Houston Texas Property Management will make your life easier contact Vestpro Residential Services today by calling us at (832) 971-1841 or click here to contact us online.

 

Need property management? Call us at 832-971-1841 or connect with us through our website.

 

 

Houston Texas Rental Market – Reasons to Have Renters Insurance

By Vestpro Residential Services

HOUSTON, TX. – Do you own rentals on the Houston Texas Rental Market? If so, there’s no denying that Hurricane Harvey was one of the worst natural disasters that we’ve ever seen and a prime example of why your tenants should have renter’s insurance.

How Should Houston Renters Get Started With Renters Insurance?

Thankfully it’s very easy to get started with renter’s insurance thanks to the Internet, any Houston renter can search online and get quotes for a renter’s insurance policy in as little as 10 minutes.

A typical renter’s insurance policy will cost a renter about $30 per month and the average deductible will be about $500.

Property owners in Houston should require their tenants to have renter’s insurance because, not only does the renters insurance policy protect the tenant if their personal belongings are damaged or destroyed due to fire or some other act of God, the renter’s insurance policy also acts as a liability policy by protecting the tenant if one of their guests is injured and needs medical attention while they are in the tenant’s rental property.

Besides covering the medical costs and expenses, the renter’s insurance policy will also cover the tenant’s legal costs as well.

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For professional property management contact Vestpro Residential Services today by calling us at (832) 971-1841 or click here to connect with us online.

Houston Texas Rental Market

Pool Safety Tips To Start Using Now

The “dog days” of summer are officially here and for the coming months we can expect temperatures in the Houston area to reach the triple digits.

If you own a rental property with a pool or spa area it’s more important than ever for you to be enforcing pool safety rules because not only will this protect your tenants, it will also protect your best interests as well and avoid any accidents, injuries or lawsuits at your swimming pool.

Pool Safety Tips You Should Start Using Now

  1. Install anti-entrapment drain covers. Make sure that your drain covers are compliant with the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool & Spa Safety Act of 2007. Virginia was the 6-year-old granddaughter of former Secretary of State James Baker. She was killed in 2003 when the suction from a hot tub drain caused her to drown. The federal law was named in her memory. Between 2012 and 2016, 17 people were trapped by drains, 14 of whom were younger than 15 years old. 2 of those victims drowned, both in residential spas.

  2. Use safety vacuum release systems with pool pumps. If the pump detects a change in vacuum pressure that could be caused by a person’s body, the pump will either shut off, or the system will inject air into the pump. This will free the person from the suction, thereby preventing drowning.

  3. Educate parents on community pool safety tips, including keeping children away from pool drains.

  4. Train staff on first-aid and lifesaving techniques. Have a Red Cross employee train your staff and any interested residents on community pool safety.

  5. Child-proof pool enclosures. Fencing around your pool area should be at least 4 feet high. Check for areas where older children could sneak through. Make sure that gates are self-closing and self-latching, with latches out of reach of very small children.

  6. Post community pool safety rules in a prominent location. In writing these rules, residential managers must balance community pool safety with the danger of discriminatory language. A blanket rule such as “No children under age 13” may not pass legal muster. This is particularly true in California, where we have at least two precedents: Iniestra v. Cliff Warren Investments, Inc. and Llanos v. Estate of Coelho. Both cases found that rules restricting children from using pool facilities without an adult, or keeping them away from adult-only areas, were overly restrictive and constituted prima facie discrimination. For more on this topic, check out our post Watch Your Language: What Can We Learn from Recent HUD Enforcement Actions?

  7. Enforce no-alcohol rules in your pool area. Give your security guards the authority to remove residents or guests who are disregarding community pool safety or abusing pool privileges.

  8. Don’t allow plugged-in devices anywhere near the pool deck or hot tub. You can also disable electrical outlets that are in close proximity.

  9. Prohibit glass containers in the pool area. One shattered glass endangers a lot of bare feet.

  10. Get a staff member certified in pool maintenance. Even if you subcontract pool maintenance out, it’s a good idea to have someone on staff educated in chlorination, sanitation procedures, and what it takes to maintain a busy swimming pool. Here’s a list of certified pool operator training programs from the Center for Disease Control and the National Swimming Pool Foundation.

  11. Check chlorine and pH levels at least twice a day with pool test strips. The Center for Disease Control recommends that you check for free chlorine (2-4 ppm) and bromine (4-6 ppm). The pH level should be between 7.2 and 7.8. This will prevent outbreaks of Legionnaire’s Disease, which can be caused by pathogens that develop in insufficiently sanitized water, and can spread via water vapor or droplets.

  12. Inspect pool equipment annually, such as pumps, drains, and heaters. Keep a logbook to track inspections.

  13. Inventory lifesaving supplies. Check to make sure that no one has stolen, vandalized, or lost your pool rings and rescue poles.

  14. Consider hiring a lifeguard. Outsourcing this to a lifeguard service may make sense from a liability perspective. Ensure that your vendor is insured and bonded. If your budget is tight, you can potentially hire a pool attendant rather than a trained lifeguard. You can learn about the differences between pool attendants and lifeguards on Guard for Life.

  15. Hire a pool management company. Again, a properly licensed, bonded, and insured pool management company can take the day-to-day load of pool maintenance off of your staff. It also relieves you of the hassle of storing large amounts of HAZMAT materials on-site. Furthermore, since they carry their own errors and omissions insurance as well as general liability coverage, their insurers will absorb any liability that may arise from pool-related incidents. A professional pool maintenance firm will also keep up with community pool safety-related federal, state, and local laws—something that your staff may not have time to do.

  16. Consider installing CCTV cameras to surveil your pool area. These systems are much less expensive than they used to be even a few years ago. They can feed directly to your security shed at night and help you to prevent after-hours incidents and lawsuits.

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For professional property management contact Vestpro Residential Services by calling us at (832) 498-0016 or click here to connect with us online.

 

Other People’s Money – Learn more about how this Real Estate investing principle works

Consider the goal of funding a child’s college education in the future. If “other people’s money” in the form of a scholarship is not a possibility, there still may be another way to use some “other people’s money.”

The Power Of Other People’s Money

A $25,000 investment into a mutual fund paying 5% would earn $1,250 in the first year. Alternatively, the $25,000 as a 20% down payment to purchase a $125,000 rental home appreciating 3% a year would have gone up by $3,750 or three times that of the mutual fund in the first year.

The mutual fund’s growth depends on the value of the money invested. Rental real estate benefits because a 20% down payment controls a much larger asset because you’re using “other people’s money.” Leverage allows the investor to profit not only from the amount of cash invested but from the value of the investment.

How Other People’s Money Pays Off 

With a 20% down payment and current interest rates, a typical rental would have a positive cash flow. In ten years, the equity could be $75,000. On the other hand, the $25,000 initial investment in a mutual fund earning 5% annually would only grow to about $40,000 in the same 10 years. It would require an additional $2,700 each year to reach the same $75,000 value.

Leverage is just one of the many benefits that make rental real estate the IDEAL investment. Whether you are saving for higher education, retirement or wealth accumulation, consider rental real estate. Using single-family homes as investments are attractive because homeowners have a better understanding than many other investments and self-management is a possibility.

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For professional property management contact Vestpro Residential Services by calling us at (832) 498-0016 or click here to connect with us online.

How often should your Houston TX rental property be inspected?

If you’re like most owners you’ve probably wondered how often should you have your Houston TX rental property inspected.

Should you have it inspected every three months, six months or one year? In this blog post we will answer this question and provide you with more property management tips.

How Often Do I Need a Rental Home Inspection?

So how often should you schedule a rental home inspection? It depends upon several factors:

If you have crawlspaces or a basement, you might want to invest in a rental home inspection every 2-3 years, or each time your property comes up for re-rental. You may also want to inspect this more frequently if you have older plumbing or wiring, or if your home is in an area with a lot of moisture, an extreme climate, or both.

If your home is newer and was professionally inspected when you bought it, and you don’t have major weather extremes, you can probably get away with a longer inspection cycle.

If your home has never been professionally inspected since you’ve owned it, do it now.

Another reason to have a rental home inspection is if you are planning a major renovation project anyway. Why? You don’t want to have already committed thousands of dollars to a bathroom remodel only to discover that you need to replace your furnace. Conduct a reconnaissance before you march.

Get Houston Texas Property Management Here

For affordable and professional Houston Texas property management contact Vestpro Residential Services by calling us at (832) 498-0016 or click here to connect with us online.