Reasons to Hire a Kingwood Texas Property Management Company

By Vestpro Residential Services

Have you been thinking about hiring a Kingwood Texas Property Management Company to manage your portfolio of rental properties? If so, you’ve come to the right place! In this article, we will share with you reasons to hire a property management company to professionally manage your portfolio of rental properties.

We Specialize in Tenant Screening, Placement, and Retention

From screening the right tenants to live in your Kingwood Texas rental properties, to tenant placement, and tenant retention, you can count on us to find the most qualified tenants to live in your rental properties who will care for your rental property as their own and enjoy living there.

You can also count on us to offer the best customer service and support possible to your tenants so that when it comes time for them to renew their leases they will be motivated to renew for another year rather than look elsewhere for a Kingwood Texas Rental.

Our Property Managers Will Save You Time and Money

As your portfolio of rental properties grows you can count on us to save you time each month because you won’t have to travel out to your rentals for things like maintenance, you can count on us to professionally manage all aspects of your rental properties so you can focus on continuing to grow your portfolio of rental properties.

Besides saving you time and money, another reason to choose Kingwood Texas Property Management is you can also count on us to make all aspects of your rental property function better, maintaining the value of your investment, and ensuring that it will continue to produce revenue for you for years to come.

Get Kingwood Texas Property Management

For professional Kingwood, Texas Property Management contact Vestpro Residential Services today by calling us at (832) 498-0026 or click here to connect with us online.

 

How often should your Houston TX rental property be inspected?

If you’re like most owners you’ve probably wondered how often should you have your Houston TX rental property inspected.

Should you have it inspected every three months, six months or one year? In this blog post we will answer this question and provide you with more property management tips.

How Often Do I Need a Rental Home Inspection?

So how often should you schedule a rental home inspection? It depends upon several factors:

If you have crawlspaces or a basement, you might want to invest in a rental home inspection every 2-3 years, or each time your property comes up for re-rental. You may also want to inspect this more frequently if you have older plumbing or wiring, or if your home is in an area with a lot of moisture, an extreme climate, or both.

If your home is newer and was professionally inspected when you bought it, and you don’t have major weather extremes, you can probably get away with a longer inspection cycle.

If your home has never been professionally inspected since you’ve owned it, do it now.

Another reason to have a rental home inspection is if you are planning a major renovation project anyway. Why? You don’t want to have already committed thousands of dollars to a bathroom remodel only to discover that you need to replace your furnace. Conduct a reconnaissance before you march.

Get Houston Texas Property Management Here

For affordable and professional Houston Texas property management contact Vestpro Residential Services by calling us at (832) 498-0016 or click here to connect with us online.

 

 

 

 

Harmaston Texas Property Management

Are you searching for Harmaston Texas Property Management? If so, contact Vestpro Residential Services by calling us at (832) 971-1841 or click here to connect with us online.

About Harmaston Texas Property Management

At Vestpro Residential Services we specialize in all aspects of Harmaston Texas Property Management including the following: tenant screening, tenant placement, rent collection, customer service, maintenance and so much more!

Property Management will save you the time, money and hassle of managing your portfolio of rental properties yourself so that you can focus on the spending more time with your family and growing  your investments without having to spend the time managing your rental properties yourself.

Learn More About Harmaston Texas

Harmaston is a place in unincorporated northeast Harris County, Texas, United States that used to be a distinct community.[1]

Harmaston, located at the southwest corner of Lake Houston, was developed along the timber shipping railroad line Beaumont, Sour Lake and Western Railway. Lumbermen from several companies, such as the Texas Longleaf Company, lived in a boarding house in Harmaston. By the 1980s the remaining component of the community was an abandoned railway station.Wikipedia 

Now Is the Right Time for Harmaston Texas Property Management

If you plan on hiring a Harmaston Texas Property Management company now is the right time to make your move because, more people in 2017 are renting than buying and with the greater demand for rental properties in Harmaston and the Houston area you can confidently grow your portfolio of rental properties without becoming overburdened with the day-to-day tasks of managing your rental properties yourself.

To learn more about the services that we can offer you contact us today by calling (832) 971-1841, connect with us on Facebook or click here to connect with us through our website.

 

Harmaston Texas Property Management
Need a property management quote? Call us at (832) 971-1841

Tenant Screening – Changes You Need To Know

There’s no doubt that tenant screening can be one of the most complicated aspects of owning rental properties because you have to follow the requirements of the Fair Housing Act and not offend anyone. 

In 2017 tenant screening has gotten a little more complicated for owners thanks to recent policy updates from the Department of Housing And Urban Development.

HUD rolled out a 10-page policy update last year advising all landlords and property managers that using criminal history for the purpose of tenant screening may actually be discriminatory. HUD notes that nearly one-third of the U.S. population (or 100 million U.S. adults) have a criminal record of some sort, and the misuse of background checks during the tenant screening process can hinder their ability to find safe, secure, and affordable housing—a key aspect of rehabilitation. Sometimes, even those who have been arrested but not convicted have difficulty securing housing based upon their prior arrest.

Black and Latino Americans are disproportionately affected, the memo notes, as they are incarcerated at rates disproportionate to their share of the general population. Black and Latino individuals comprise an estimated 58% of the U.S. prison population, despite accounting for only 25% of the total U.S. population.

Consequently, the memo states:

Criminal records-based barriers to housing are likely to have a disproportionate impact on minority home seekers. While having a criminal record is not a protected characteristic under the Fair Housing Act, criminal history-based restrictions on housing opportunities violate the Act if, without justification, their burden falls more often on renters or other housing market participants of one race or national origin over another (i.e., discriminatory effects liability). Additionally, intentional discrimination in violation of the Act occurs if a housing provider treats individuals with comparable criminal history differently because of their race, national origin, or other protected characteristic (i.e., disparate treatment liability).

This does not mean that criminal history cannot be considered at all during the tenant screening process. Instead, HUD is basically telling landlords and property managers:

You cannot institute a blanket ban on all applicants with a criminal history.

You cannot reject a tenant based upon an arrest that did not result in conviction.

You must treat comparable criminal histories similarly without consideration of race, national origin, or other protected classes.

Because Black and Latino Americans are incarcerated at higher rates than their peers, any blanket policy for tenant screening that bans applicants with a criminal history would inadvertently discriminate against minorities. HUD cites a Supreme Court decision in reminding us that simply being arrested often has little probative value in showing that someone has actually engaged in misconduct—which is why arrests without convictions should not be used as the basis for denying a tenant.

Convictions are treated differently. Landlords and property managers may reject an applicant whose background check reveals that he/she has been convicted of a crime. There’s one big caveat: The landlord or property manager must show that excluding a person with a conviction achieves a “substantial, legitimate, nondiscriminatory purpose.” To put it simply, you have to distinguish between criminal activity that creates a demonstrable risk to resident safety and/or property, and criminal conduct that does not.

Given the new HUD guidelines, landlords and property managers should consider the following questions when reviewing a person’s criminal history:

Was the applicant convicted of a crime, or were they just arrested?

What was the severity of the crime?

How long ago was the crime committed?

Has the person reoffended since their original conviction?

Was it a drug-related crime? (HUD allows a blanket ban on those who have been convicted of illegal drug manufacturing or distribution.)

New Guidelines for Tenant Screening

HUD’s new policy memo has the downside of making the tenant screening process more complicated than it already is. It muddies the waters in terms of how landlords and property managers evaluate criminal history, as there is no guidance on which crimes should generally considered acceptable and which are not. Landlords and property managers are asked to use their discretion, with the memo acknowledging the need to look at circumstances on a case-by-case basis.

Here are a few tips to help you to comply with the new guidelines:

Screen tenants based on their financial and other qualifications first. Only conduct a background check if a person appears to be otherwise qualified. This will protect you from denying a tenant based upon another qualification, and having the tenant argue that they were denied based upon their criminal background.

If a background check reveals a criminal history, evaluate the nature of the crime (see questions above). If you plan to deny a person based upon this information, put a note in your internal file explaining why you felt a denial was appropriate (e.g. how this protects you, other tenants, and the property). Sign and date the note. This will protect you if the applicant ever alleges discrimination.

Review all existing rental policies and applicant screening procedures. Some landlords or companies may be facing a complete overhaul given the new HUD guidelines. Be sure that all members of your team clearly understand the new policies so they can be implemented uniformly by all.

Get Property Management Here

For affordable and professional property management contact Vestpro Residential today by calling us at (832) 971-1841 or click here to connect with us online.

 

 

tenant screening

HUD Anti-Discrimination Laws You Didn’t Know You Were Breaking

In 2015, the enforcement division of the Department of Housing and Urban Development announced 10 separate charges against landlords and property managers for various types of discrimination.

No ethical landlord wants to commit unlawful discrimination. But some honest employees or landlords run into trouble accidentally, despite the best of intentions, by making a mistake during the screening process, asking an innocent but misguided question or making an ill-considered remark that can form the basis of a discrimination complaint.

Let’s look at some of the mistakes made by landlords and property managers that led to discrimination charges.

Asking About Mental Health, Medical Status or Diagnoses

In one Minnesota case, a woman diagnosed with bipolar disorder attempted to rent a house with her partner. Shortly before move-in, the landlord’s agent became aware of the applicant’s history of mental health issues, and called the prospective tenant asking if there were any “issues” she wanted to disclose before moving in. The tenant disclosed her diagnosis of bipolar disorder. The agent asked for more information, but the renter told her it was “none of her business.” Subsequently, the landlord refused to rent the dwelling.

HUD Prosecutors deemed the mere inquiry into the mental health diagnosis to be a violation of 42 U.S.C. Section 361(g)(2)(A), and assessed a $16,000 civil penalty against the landlord, in addition to damages.

Discriminatory Advertising Language

In a Philadelphia case, HUD officials were alerted to a Craigslist rental advertisement containing these words: “Not good for young children.” HUD officials investigated and applied to rent the dwelling. Two HUD test coordinators called the lister, one claiming to have a 2-year old daughter, and the other posing as a single man.

The lister told the female caller that the dwelling was directly above a construction business with a lot of heavy truck traffic. The dwelling would be fine for adults, the lister explained, but dangerous to young children. The lister also told the male investigator that he wanted to rent to adults with no children because of the traffic.

HUD officials deemed the actions of the landlord’s representative to constitute illegal discrimination based on familial status. The advertisement was illegal under 42 U.S.C. Section 3604(c) and 24 C.F.R. Sections 100.75(a) and (c)1.

HUD Department officials asked courts to penalize the landlord for each violation, on top of compensatory damages.

Discrimination Based on Limited English Language Skills

An Asian-American man applied to rent a townhome in Champlin, Minn., together with his mother, who was from Thailand. They planned to reside on the property with two children. The property manager took their information and a credit background check. He also collected an application fee of $40 for each of the two adult applicants.

The son’s credit score came back at 725, and his mother’s was 761. Their income qualified the family to rent the apartment. But the manager sent the son an email stating that their rental application was declined. The reason: Both adults would have to sign the lease contract, but the mother had limited English skills. “As I’m told, legal precedent indicates the contract must be translated to her native language,” the manager wrote. “If not, she could easily break the lease.”

The manager also claimed that a certified translation would be required, costing about $500.

The son informed the manager that he had submitted an inquiry to the Department of Housing and Urban Development based on the manager’s statements about his mother’s English language skills.

HUD’s lawyers determined that denying a lease because of limited English skills, as well as the act of requiring a $500 translation fee, amounted to illegal discrimination under 42 U.S.C. Section 3604(a). The Department of Housing and Urban Development is pursuing the property manager for full compensatory damages, as well as a civil penalty of $16,000 per violation.

Get Property Management Here

For affordable and professional property management contact us today by calling (832) 971-1841 or click here to connect with us through our website.

Should you buy rentals in Houston? Even if you’re out of the area?

Thanks to the booming real estate market in the last 12 months there are more condos, town homes and apartment buildings available for purchase and rent than ever before but the big question is should you buy rentals in Houston even if you’re out of the area? The answer to this question is yes!

Pros of Buying Long-Distance Real Estate

  • The ability to buy in more affordable markets. Property values in second- and third-tier markets don’t command the premium of real estate in primary markets and there’s lower competition. That said, depending on the market, rents can still be very strong. Buying in one of these markets is a way to get your foot in the door, realize positive cash flow and build equity.

  • Real estate as a long-term strategy. Some investors decide to buy real estate in an area that they don’t currently live in, but think they might want to someday. For instance, I’d consider buying a home closer to my parents if there’s a chance I’ll want to live closer to them someday. Many investors use a similar mindset when considering real estate in vacation and retirement markets, like the Carolinas and Florida. These houses can be rented now and held in case an investor wants to live there someday, too.

  • Tax benefits. Say what you want about Trump, but when the New York Times released a copy of his 1995 tax returns it shed light on a stark reality: real estate investors are able to use the tax code to their advantage. The ability to write off interest paid on a mortgage and depreciation makes buying investment property highly attractive. The provision Trump took advantage of is no different than the loopholes that everyday investors use, too.

Get Houston Texas Property Management Here!

For affordable Houston Texas Property Management contact Vestpro Residential Services today by calling us at (832) 971-1841 or click here to connect with us online.

 

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Homeowners Associations vs. Property Management – What’s the Difference?

Is there a difference between homeowners associations and property management? If you asked most renters the answer would be no, but the reality is that there is a big difference between the two.

Homeowners Associations vs. Property Management

It’s easy to confuse a homeowners association (HOA) with property managers. They are both involved in the management of housing communities. It could be helpful to view a brief description of both HOAs and property managers to see how the functions of each are different. In most cases, they work together, but sometimes they may come into conflict. This information should be useful to property owners, property management companies, and tenants who live in a community that is governed by an HOA.

 

What Are Homeowners Associations?

Neighborhoods, subdivisions, and condo complexes contain lots of housing units that are owned by many different owners. At the same time, homeowners may need to share the responsibility for certain things. They may also share expectations for the way that their neighbors will maintain their properties. Thus, these communities form HOAs to develop and enforce the rules (known as covenants, conditions, and restrictions, or CC&Rs for short) that all property owners need to abide by.

According to the Community Association Institute, over 63 million Americans reside in an estimated 320,000 association-governed communities.

The individuals who belong to these organizations also own property in that community. While all HOA members may propose and vote on rules, an elected HOA board usually has the final responsibility for ensuring that rules get kept and other responsibilities get met.

Besides making and enforcing rules, typical HOA responsibilities include:

  • Maintaining common areas, like playgrounds and swimming pools
  • Setting and collecting dues to pay for things like maintenance of common areas and security
  • Setting budgets for the items that HOA dues pay for
  • Obtaining insurance for common areas
  • Hiring staff and contractors

Obviously, the HOA doesn’t physically perform all of their responsibilities. For example, they may hire security people, secretaries, and maintenance crews. In some cases, overseeing all of the work requires a separate property manager to assist them. To help with all of the tasks involved, an HOA may also hire a property manager or property management company.

What Do Property Managers Do in a Homeowners Association?

There are two different situations when a community may have both property managers and homeowners associations. In the most commonly discussed case, the property management company works for the HOA. In another case, property owners may own some houses or condos in a community that also has owner-occupied units. In this second case, the property owners and their managers are just property owners with the same status as any other owners. If property owners occupy their own housing or lease it to tenants, they still have the same responsibilities to the HOA.

Property managers as employees of the HOA: HOA members may volunteer for their positions as an investment in their community. As volunteers, they may not have time to oversee all of the day-to-day obligations of the board. In this case, an HOA might hire a property manager or property management company to assist them.

The duties of property managers can vary, but they may include overseeing paid staff or contractors, communicating with residents, collecting dues, and handling emergencies. As employees of the HOA board, property managers report to them.

Property managers as owners within the community: In this case, property managers simply have to abide by the same rules that any owners who occupy their homes do. This situation is somewhat more complex because tenants actually occupy the property. The owners and tenants may have to cooperate to stay in compliance.

The property managers for leased housing units may make sure that HOA dues get paid if this cost is simply included in the rent. Still, they need to make certain their tenants don’t violate other rules. For example, there may be guidelines about maintaining lawns, how to handle garbage, behavior in common areas, and so on. It’s prudent to include a clause in the lease about adhering to HOA rules and to make sure that renters know the guidelines.

Get Houston Property Management Here

For affordable Houston Texas Property Management contact Vestpro Residential services today by calling us today at (832) 971-1841 or click here to connect with us online.

 

 

 

Simple Curb Appeal Tips For Your Houston Rental Property

Struggling with adding Curb Appeal to your Houston Rental Property? One of the great things about flower pots is that this is a simple curb appeal improvement that anyone can add themselves and what’s even better is that they are super affordable so if you’re on a budget and just starting out with your first rental property you can stretch your budget further with this curb appeal “hack”.

Get Houston Property Management

For the best property management in the Houston area contact Vestpro today by calling us at (832) 971-1841 or click here to connect with us online. 

For Rent in Houston – 3 Ways Property Managers Save You Time

Property Management
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HOUSTON, TX. – Has your portfolio of properties For Rent In Houston been growing this year and you’re running out of time to enjoy the cash flow because you’re always busy managing your rentals?

If you found yourself answering yes to this question, but you still aren’t sure if it’s the decision for you to make or not for your business, this article will provide you with 3 ways a property manager will save you time.

Vacancy Prevention

This is top on the list of ways that property managers can save you time and money because when your property For Rent in Houston is sitting vacant you’re not making any money or receiving consistent cash flow.

For Rent in Houston: We Make Sure You Have Qualified Tenants

We will make sure that your rental property will be occupied by a qualified tenant and your rental property will be professionally managed so your rental property will not be vacant due to non-payment of rent or evictions.

Professional Rent Collection

As a landlord with a property For Rent in Houston, one of the biggest problems that you may have had in the past is rent collection. Thankfully, when you choose a Houston Property Manager you can have confidence that rent from your rental properties will be collected on time each month and you will also be paid on time, eliminating the need for you to contact tenants and collect rent when it’s due.

Cost-Conscious Rental Property Maintenance

Did you know that as Houston Landlord you can expect to pay the equivalent of about two months-worth of rent just on property maintenance alone each year? What’s awesome about working with a professional property management company is that you don’t have to sweat maintenance when marketing your single family home, town home or condo For Rent In Houston because we’re also budget-conscious and will use relationships that we have with local contractors to make sure that you pay the lowest maintenance or repair costs every time.

Get Property Management Here

For professional property management for your condo, town home or single family home For Rent in Houston contact Vestpro Residential Services at (832) 498-0016 or click here to connect with us online.

What Are Tenants Expecting When They Move Into A Houston Rental Property?

HOUSTON, TX. – If you are planning on buying Houston Texas Rental Property it’s important for you to know that every tenant has certain “expectations” before they move in and if you want to own rental property that produces significant return on investment for you for years to come it’s important for you to exceed those tenant expectations before every tenant moves in.

The Houston Texas Rental Property Must Be Clean

The first expectation that every renter has from the moment that they walk into a Houston Texas Rental Property is that it’s going to be clean and in habitable condition and this includes clean flooring, windows, window sills and blinds.

Besides basic cleaning in the rental property the kitchen and bathrooms must also be clean and in excellent condition as well since most people will either spend the most time in the kitchen or bathroom and expect both of these areas to be ready for use immediately and not require extra cleaning after they move in.

The Rental Property Must Be Well Managed

After a tenant moves in the next thing that they will expect is for the Houston Texas Rental Property to be well-managed and this means that someone will be available 24/7 if problems or issues arise at the rental property that need to be resolved.

Part of a well-managed Houston Rental also means that promises will be kept when it comes time to make repairs or improvements to the rental property because this will keep tenants happy and content in knowing that management cares about them plus values their business.

Get Houston Texas Property Management

If you need property management for your Houston Texas Rental property contact Vestpro Residential Services by calling us at (832) 498-0016 or click here to connect with us online